Thursday, March 03, 2005

Child molester and Oxford Scholar fraud Rabbi Mordechai Gafni to speak at Harvard on negotiation June 20-24, 2005

8 Comments:

At 6:24 AM, Blogger jewishwhistleblower said...

https://www.pon.harvard.edu/research/hnii/june05_intro.php3

Harvard Negotiation Insight Initiative
Summer Learning Forum

June 20-24, 2005
Harvard Law School
Cambridge, Massachusetts
Workshops with Leonard Riskin and Melissa Blacker, Jack Himmelstein and Norman Fischer, and Erica Fox and Marc Gafni

This program is in cooperation with The American Bar Association Dispute Resolution Section

 
At 6:27 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Hoenlein salary in Forward.

 
At 6:57 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Harvard Contact Information:
Please send questions and comments to Cristin Martineau at cmartin@law.harvard.edu or call (617) 495-7711

-----------------------------------------------------


Harvard Negotiation Insight Initiative
Summer Learning Forum

June 20-24, 2005
Harvard Law School
Cambridge, Massachusetts
Workshops with
Leonard Riskin and Melissa Blacker,
Jack Himmelstein and Norman Fischer, and Erica Fox and Marc Gafni
https://www.pon.harvard.edu/research/hnii/june05_intro.php3

This program is in cooperation with
The American Bar Association Dispute Resolution Section

-----------------------------------------------------
Beyond Yes:
Deeper Wisdom and the Art of Negotiation
with Erica Ariel Fox and Marc Gafni
https://www.pon.harvard.edu/research/hnii/june05_workshops.php3


Life is a series of negotiations. Most of us realize that we negotiate in some form virtually every day -- from business leaders and managers to lawyers and judges, from government agents to psychologists and educators, spouses and parents -- the list goes on and on. It is conventional wisdom today that the old style of haggling in the foreign bazaar or brinksmanship in foreign diplomacy, deal-making, or personal relationships, are not helpful models in most negotiations. By now we know that these modes can restrict "expanding the pie," leave value on the table, strain working relationships, result in parties walking away from deals where a beneficial resolution was possible, and all too often, escalate conflict to new levels of danger or discord. In response to this understanding in the last quarter-century, professionals around the world have been trained in collaborative forms of negotiation.
And yet, with all of our understanding and training, we still don't always "get to yes." Too often, at the pivoting points of pressure, and under the strain of high stakes or intense conflict, we revert back to a competitive, zero-sum, win-lose paradigm. We become rigid in our view that we are right and we fail to call on the listening and empathy skills we have learned. We become reactive to the other side rather than keeping our cool. Sometimes we say things we later wish we hadn't. Sometimes we keep silent rather than saying what needed to be said. In all these cases, when we look back and feel unhappy with the outcome we ended up with, or dissatisfied with how we behaved, we see situations in which our "negotiation skills" didn’t seem to work.
This course explores the notion that our skills fail us at critical times because we have mastered the techniques but we have not become "masters." To take a popular image as a metaphor, we have learned some important skills of swordsmanship, but have not become Jedi Knights of negotiation. In other words, we wield our skills but are not connected with an underlying force field of wisdom tradition and insight, the territory that is "beyond yes." Going "beyond yes" requires internalizing the deeper wisdom beneath our skills as part of our very being and likewise using wisely the lessons we have acquired through life experience as a guide in dealing well with others. Using an approach we call "archetypes and autobiography" you will learn how working with timeless principles and your own life story can deepen and expand your range and effectiveness as a negotiator. The course is about fostering alignment between what you know on the outside and what you live on the inside, especially when the going gets tough, so you can negotiate for the results you want and look back on your own behavior without regrets.

 
At 6:58 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

The PON Executive Committee is responsible for overseeing the Program's operations and strategic direction.

Executive Committee

Chair Professor Robert H. Mnookin, Harvard Law School
Hauser 416
Harvard Law School
mnookin@law.harvard.edu
(617) 495-9201

Lawrence Susskind, Vice-Chair, Education Professor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
617-253-2026 (MIT), 617-492-1414 (CBI)
617-253-7409 (MIT), 617-492-1919 (CBI) (fax)
susskind@mit.edu

James Sebenius, Vice-Chair, PracticeProfessor, Harvard Business School
Baker Library 165
Harvard Business School
Boston, MA 02163
jusebenius@hbs.edu
(617) 495-9334
(617) 496-7379 (fax)


Max Bazerman - Vice Chair, Research, Harvard Business School
Baker Library 265
Soldiers Field Road
Boston, MA 02163 USA
mbazerman@hbs.edu
(617) 495-6429
(617) 496-7379 (fax)

Frank E. A. Sander, Member Professor, Harvard Law School
Hauser 310
Harvard Law School
sander@law.harvard.edu
(617)495-3184

Guhan Subramanian, MemberProfessor, Harvard Law School

Iris Bohnet, MemberAssociate Professor, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University

 
At 7:12 AM, Blogger jewishwhistleblower said...

Gafni certainly has experience negotiating his way out of scandal after scandal.

 
At 7:20 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

So what can we do to stop him? We can sit back and just complain, or we can encourage everyone we know to contact Harvard and let them know of Gafni's past.

I also was wondering if anyone had the names and phone numbers of the news media in the area that surrounds Harvard? Maybe they would be interested in doing a story about him? Public pressure can and does make a difference.

 
At 3:08 PM, Blogger APlace2BHeard said...

Please write these Harvard lawyers well thought correspondence. One well articulated voice may be heard. Many voices may prompt a response.

 
At 9:05 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Over the past 25 years this case has been investigated again and again with the same conclusion each time: the accusation against Gafni by the 16 year old was totally false and was in fact dismissed at the time. For you to call him a child molester is absurd, misleading, and disgusting.

 

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