Tuesday, January 11, 2005

Rabbi Yosef Dayan future King of Israel (and current death curse king): yet another reason why the new Sanhedrin in Isreal is doomed to failure

5 Comments:

At 3:51 PM, Blogger jewishwhistleblower said...

see: http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=JPost/JPArticle/ShowFull&cid=1105418785934

 
At 4:09 PM, Blogger Daniel the Bold said...

Hear ye, hear ye: Sanhedrin seeks David's scion as king

 
At 6:46 PM, Blogger jewishwhistleblower said...

http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=JPost/JPArticle/ShowFull&cid=1105418785934

Jan. 12, 2005
Hear ye, hear ye: Sanhedrin seeks David's scion as king
By YAAKOV KATZ

Will Jews begin proclaiming "Long live the king" in the near future?

According to a group of 71 Jewish scholars who met this week in the Old City of Jerusalem in the form of a modern-day Sanhedrin – a duplicate of the religious tribunal which convened during the time of the Second Temple – a coronation day is growing closer.

As one member of the group put it, "We would have liked it to happen yesterday. But we are willing to wait until tomorrow."

There hasn't been a genuine Sanhedrin in Israel for nearly 1,600 years; the last one to be proclaimed was in France, by Napoleon, for political gain. Shortly after the establishment of the State of Israel, religious affairs minister Judah Leib Maimon raised the notion of reinstituting the ancient body, to no avail.

The group composed largely of Kahane sympathizers that gave itself the name Sanhedrin in October, however, met Sunday to discuss the creation of a Jewish monarchy in the State of Israel.

For the past several years a group called the Monarchists has conducted extensive research into the lineage of several families in an effort to discover who has the closest bloodline to the biblical King David – a requirement for any future Jewish king.

Rabbi Yosef Dayan from Psagot, known for his recent threats to place a death curse on Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, is said to be a leading candidate to become the "king of Israel."

"Dayan has the best lineage to King David," several members of the Sanhedrin told The Jerusalem Post. They say he has two documented ancient sources which draw a direct line between him and the males in his family to King David some 3,000 years ago.

"Many people can show they are descendants of King David, but they cannot show that the line is only male," one Sanhedrin member explained. "That makes Dayan the leading candidate to become king."

The Monarchists have consulted with non-Jewish experts on lineage. They concurred that, without a doubt, Dayan is a direct descendent of the House of David.

The only question now is how to establish the Jewish monarchy in spite of the presiding democratic government.

"There are two possibilities," Dayan explained. "The first is that the nation or a majority from within will want the monarchy and will uproot the presiding democratic government."

The second, more realistic option, he said, is "the one cited by Maimonides – and that is that no one will know how it will be until it happens."

Some of the other ideas discussed at the Sanhedrin meeting included the construction of an altar on the Temple Mount to be used for the Passover Offering during the upcoming holiday.

One of the ideas, members said, is to climb the Mount and build the altar within minutes and sacrifice the lamb before security forces can stop them. Another, said leading Sanhedrin member Baruch Ben-Yosef, is to pray for a tsunami-like disaster on the Mount.

"In one second, God wiped out 150,000 people," he said. "Who knows? Maybe he'll help us if we show him we are ready."

Participants also discussed Ben-Yosef's idea of reinstating the Sanhedrin's authority to announce Rosh Hodesh, the beginning of the new lunar month.
"It is very important to reinstate the Sanhedrin's authority to announce the month, because it will force people to understand that God gave us the power to control the calendar and our own destiny," Ben-Yosef said.

 
At 6:53 PM, Blogger jewishwhistleblower said...

1)
Members of Reestablished Sanhedrin Ascend Temple Mount.
By IsraelNationalNews.com
Israel Faxx
December 9, 2004

In a dramatic but unpublicized move Monday, members of the newly established Sanhedrin ascended the Temple Mount, Judaism's holiest site.

Close to 50 recently ordained "samuchim," members of the Sanhedrin, lined up at the foot of the Temple Mount.

The men, many ascending the Temple Mount for the first time, had immersed in mikvaot (ritual baths) that morning and planned to ascend as a group. Despite prior approval from the Israeli police who oversee entry to the Mount, the officers barred the group from entering the Mount together, saying they could only ascend in groups of 10.

Many of the samuchim refused to ascend under the restrictive conditions, especially as a group of over 100 gentile tourists filed past the waiting rabbis and up onto the holy site. "It is unconscionable that on the eve of Chanukah, which celebrates the rededication of the Holy Temple, we should once again be barred from worshipping - by our own people," Rabbi Chaim Richman of Jerusalem's Temple Institute told IsraelNN's Ezra HaLevi.

The Sanhedrin, a religious assembly of 71 sages that sat from the time of the Holy Temple through 425 CE, was the highest Jewish legal-judicial tribunal in the Land of Israel. The great court used to convene in one of the Temple's chambers in Jerusalem. On October 14, the Sanhedrin was reestablished for the first time in 1,600 years, at the site of its last meeting in Tiberius.

"There is a special mitzvah, not connected to time, but tied to our presence in Israel, to establish a Sanhedrin," Rabbi Meir HaLevi (no relation), one of the 71 members of the new Sanhedrin, told Israel National Radio's Weekend Edition. "The Rambam [12th century Torah scholar Maimonides] describes the process exactly in [his seminal work codifying Jewish Law] the Mishna Torah. When he wrote it there was no Sanhedrin, and he therefore outlines the steps necessary to establish one. When there is a majority of rabbis, in Israel, who authorize one person to be a 'samuch,' an authority, he can then reestablish the Sanhedrin."

Those behind the revival of the Sanhedrin stress that the revival of the legal body is not optional, but mandated by the Torah. "We don't have a choice," says Rabbi Richman, "it is a religious mandate for us to establish a Sanhedrin."

The Sanhedrin was reestablished through the ordination of a rabbi agreed-upon by the majority of prominent rabbis in Israel and approved as "fitting to serve" by former Chief Sefardi Rabbi Ovadia Yosef and leading Ashkenazi Rabbi Shalom Elyashiv. That rabbi, who is then considered to have received authentic ordination as handed down from Moses, was then able to give ordination to 70 others, making up the quorum of 71 necessary for the Sanhedrin.

The rabbis behind the Sanhedrin's reconstitution claim that, like the State of Israel, the old-new Sanhedrin is a work-in-progress. They see it as a vessel that, once established, will reach the stature and authority that it once had. "The first members requested that their names not be published, so as to allow it to grow without public criticism of individuals," HaLevi said. "We want to give it time to develop and strengthen the institution, giving a chance for more rabbis to join." He added that each of the current members of the Sanhedrin has agreed to be a conditional member until a more knowledgeable rabbi joins, taking his place.

Rabbi Richman, also a member of the Sanhedrin, hopes the body will bring about a revolution in Jewish jurisprudence. Declining to discuss exactly what issues are on the Sanhedrin's agenda, Richman said that one of the main long-term goals of the Sanhedrin, which includes members of Ashkenazi, Sefardi, Hasidic, National-Religious and Haredi communities, is to reunify Jewish observance in Israel.

2)
Sanhedrin Launched in Tiberias.
By IsraelNationalNews.com
Israel Faxx
October 14, 2004

A unique ceremony - probably only the second of its kind in the past 1,600 years - took place in Tiberias Wednesday: The launching of a Sanhedrin, the highest Jewish-legal tribunal in the Land of Israel.

The Sanhedrin, a religious assembly that convened in one of the Holy Temple chambers in Jerusalem, comprised 71 sages and existed during the Tannaitic period, from several decades before the Common Era until roughly 425 C.E. Details of Wednesday's ceremony remain sketchy, but the organizers' announced their intention to convene 71 rabbis who have received special rabbinic ordination as specified by Maimonides.

An attempt to reconvene the Sanhedrin was made several centuries ago in Tzfat. The body in fact ordained such greats as Rabbi Yosef Karo, the author of the classic Jewish Law code Shulhan Arukh. However, the opposition of other leading rabbis soon forced the end of the endeavor.

One of the leaders of the new attempt to revive the Sanhedrin is Rabbi Yeshai Ba'avad of Beit El. He said that the 71 rabbis "from across the spectrum received the special ordination, in accordance with Maimonides' rulings, over the past several months." Ba'avad explained that the membership of the new body is not permanent: "What is much more crucial is the establishment of this body. Those who are members of it today will not necessarily be its members tomorrow. But the goal is to have one rabbinic body in Jerusalem that will convene monthly and issue rulings on central issues. This is the need of the generation and of the hour."

Rabbi Yisrael Ariel, who heads the Temple institute in Jerusalem, is one of the participating rabbis. He told Arutz-7 today, "Whether this will be the actual Sanhedrin that we await, is a question of time - just like the establishment of the State; we rejoiced in it, but we are still awaiting something much more ideal. It's a process. Today's ceremony is really the continuation of the renewal of the Ordination process in Israel, which we marked several months ago. Our Talmudic Sages describe the 10 stages of exile of the Sanhedrin from Jerusalem to other locations, until it ended in Tiberias - and this is the place where it was foretold that it would be renewed, and from here it will be relocated to Jerusalem."

Ariel said that the rabbis there included many from the entire spectrum: "Hareidi, religious-Zionist, Sephardi, Ashkenazi, hassidi, and many others - such as Rabbi Yoel Schwartz, Rabbi Adin Shteinzaltz and many others... We can't expect a great consensus; that's not how things work here. But sometimes that's how the process goes, from the bottom up."

3)
ISRAEL: NEW SANHEDRIN WANTS TO REPLACE KNESSET.
By Aldo Baquis
ANSA - English Media Service
Y30
October 13, 2004

(ANSA) - TEL AVIV, October 13 - A new Sanhedrin (a Jewish Council) will open for the first time after 1,660 years on Thursday evening on the Tiberiade lake shore in the Abulafia Synagogue.

"A historic day for the Jewish people," rang out enthusiastically colonial radio, Channel 7.

No other Israeli media has paid even the minimum attention to the event, probably considering it a bizarre initiative of the rabbis, who also dream of reconstructing the Jerusalem Temple and returning to sacrifice rituals.

In the ancient times, the Sanhedrin had 71 members, elected among the doctrine leaders. Side by side with the monarch, they used to represent a moral, political, administrative and judicial guide for that time. They used to meet in the Jerusalem Temple. After its destruction in 70 AD by Tito's Roman legions, the Sanhedrin moved south, to the city of Yavne.

What is the reason for the awakening from its lethargy such an archaic institution?

One of the organisers, Rabbi Yishai Baabed from the Beit El settlement, near Ramallah, told the radio that the Sanhedrin was founded to turn into a benchmark for the religious people, both on hot national problems and the aspects of daily life.

Contrary to the Knesset parliamentarians, its members were elected among the top religious authorities in the country. Unlike the Jerusalem Supreme Court, its edicts were fully-based on the Mosaic Law.

The Tiberiade, a tourism area whose thermal springs were loved by emperor Tiberius, wants to become the place where a new Israeli religion-based leadership is born.

Moshe Feiglin, who claims secular Zionism has already completed its historic mission, found a current called "Jewish Leadership" as part of Likud.

Feiglin has been known to the Israeli secret services since when they discovered that a group of 23, calling itself Little Sahnedrin, was meeting secretly in a Jerusalem house.

Professor Hillel Weiss, one of the intellectuals promoting the replacing of Israel's current form of government with a monarchy, was among the participants in these meetings which later laid the foundations of the current Sahnedrin.

"We want to create a religious alternative to challenge Israel's secular leadership," Weiss explained then.

The conflict between Zealots and the government has been fuelled by Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's decision for an Israeli withdrawal from the Gaza Strip even if this would lead to the moving of some 20 Jewish settlements.

According to Cabbalist Rabbi Yitzhak Kaduri's website kaduri.net, a document entitled "The Rebellion Has Started" has been spread through the country's synagogues. Despite his advanced age of over hundred years, Kaduri knows what he is talking about. Last August he was the one to foresee the return of the Sanhedrin.

The Jewish religious avant-garde warns in the leaflet that it intends to rebuild the Jerusalem Temple and to reestablish the monarchy.

"We want a monarchic instead of the current fascist regime which only pretends to be democratic," the authors of the leaflet said. "Sharon threatens to expel the settlers from their homes and he is loosing the remainder of his legitimacy. The Supreme Court represents the interests of the enemy."

The current Israeli government threatens the existence of the Israelis, the leaflet also reads.

Kaduri advises his followers to choose the hard-line. He explains that for the last four years, since the beginning of the intifada and then with the war between the West and al-Qaeda, an apocalyptic war between Gog and Magog is being underway.

"It will last seven years," Kaduri said interpreting sacred texts which also said that the conflict will have a happy-end. "Sharon will be the last Prime Minister and his successor will be the Messiah."

 
At 6:03 AM, Blogger jewishwhistleblower said...

http://www.israelnationalnews.com/news.php3?id=75313

Sanhedrin Rabbis Discuss Sublime, Procedural Issues
12:59 Jan 14, '05 / 4 Shevat 5765

The 71 rabbis seeking to fulfill the Biblical commandment of renewing the Sanhedrin continue to meet regularly, solidifying their organizational structure and establishing an agenda of topics.

Their most recent meeting was this week, in which they discussed technical and procedural issues, topics for their agenda, and the Halakhic [Jewish legal] and other ramifications of renewing the Passover sacrifice.

The rabbis held a festive ceremony this past October 13th, the 28th day of the Jewish month of Tishrei, inaugurating the Sanhedrin as Judaism's supreme legal body. They stress that by doing so, they are merely fulfilling a Biblical mitzvah (obligation). “It is a special mitzvah , based on our presence in Israel, to establish a Sanhedrin,” Rabbi Meir HaLevi, one of the 71 members of the new Sanhedrin, has explained. “The Rambam [12th-century Torah scholar Maimonides] describes the process exactly in the Mishnah Torah [his seminal work codifying Jewish Law]. When he wrote it, there was no Sanhedrin, and he therefore outlines the steps necessary to establish one."

A religious-legal assembly of 71 Sages that convened in the Holy Temple and for several centuries after its destruction, the Sanhedrin was the highest Jewish judicial tribunal in the Land of Israel. Organizers of the current edition stress that they are still in a transitional phase, and that though today's members are all Torah scholars and experts in many secular and scientific fields, every one of them has agreed to step aside the moment a more deserving candidate should step forward.

Meeting in Jerusalem’s Old City, the Sanhedrin consists of representatives of all stripes of religious Jewish society. Hareidi-religious, Hassidic, national-religious, Ashkenazi, Sephardic, modern Orthodox and university professors sit side by side in a semi-circle, seeking to re-establish Jewish legal tradition after 2,000 years of exile.

"We can make a real difference," said one member, Rabbi Chaim Richman of Jerusalem. "Many cardinal issues are on the public agenda, and our body – which is totally based on Torah, even down to its rules and regulations – is naturally geared to deal with them. Issues such as agunot (estranged women whose husbands refuse to give them a divorce), abortions, traffic safety, economic issues, education, and so much more."

"Not only are we commanded to establish the Sanhedrin," Rabbi Richman told Arutz-7's Yosef Meiri, "but this seems to be the perfect time to do so - a time of Divine will. On the one hand, there is a spiritual void in the 'establishment,' and on the other hand, there is a real thirst among the public for spirituality and guidance."

The Sanhedrin's takanon, document of regulations, is still undergoing final adjustments prior to its official adoption. A permanent Nassi, President, and Av Beit HaDin, literally, Court Father, still must be elected. The continuing role of the Vaad HaMechonen , the founding committee that has led the Sanhedrin thus far, also needs to be determined. But the Sanhedrin is carefully moving ahead, strictly adhering to the guidelines set out by Maimonides, who classified the obligation to reestablish the Sanhedrin as one that is incumbent upon every generation.

“The Sanhedrin is past its greatest initial hurdles,” a spokesman told IsraelNN's Ezra HaLevi, “namely, the return of genuine semikha [authentic rabbinical ordination] to Israel, and the historic meeting in Tiberias in Tishrei, at which 71 rabbis actually convened and officially reinstated the Sanhedrin. We believe these achievements are irreversible.”

Contrary to the expected criticism, Sanhedrin organizers insist that the reinstatement ceremony was neither just a show nor a one-time phenomenon, but is rather Halakhically-sound and a true beginning.

The rabbis were asked to prepare topics they thought the Sanhedrin should deal with, and a fascinating array of topics was produced. In addition to those mentioned above by Rabbi Richman, the list included such issues as:
* uniform kashrut certification
* the precise length of the biblical cubit (with ramifications on many issues, including the location of the altar on the Temple Mount)
* unemployment
* assisting Anousim from Spain and Portugal and others whose ancestors were forced to convert
* lost Jewish tribes from other parts of the world
* unifying Sephardic and Ashkenazi practices on issues such as prayer liturgy, kitniyot (legumes) on Passover, and glass utensils
* the Sanhedrin's decision-making procedures
* foreign workers
* unifying the religious parties
* restoring the Davidic monarchy
* an ethical code for Israel's army (as opposed to the present one, which is based largely on secular sources)
* the establishment of regional "small Sanhedrins"
* the long-missing "t'chelet" blue color
* sending delegations around the country to hear people's concerns,
and much more.

Though a lecture on renewing the Paschal offering was delivered at the last meeting, not all of the 71 are yet convinced that the time is ripe for it. Various opinions were put forth, including by those opposed to the renewal of the Passover offering until the exact location of the Temple altar is determined through prophecy.

"The real achievement of the meeting was that rabbis from such diverse backgrounds could sit together to discuss such an issue," said Rabbi Michael S. Bar-Ron, an associate of the Sanhedrin from Beit Shemesh. " It demonstrated that the Sanhedrin is alive, and has begun the long road towards its chief goal of restoring the crown of Torah to its former glory."

As expected, the issue of the disengagement came up, but the acting Nassi refused to allow the discussion until at least one rabbi supporting the plan could be found to present a sincere argument supporting it. No one could be found, and the topic was dropped.

"The Sanhedrin aims to inspire the Jewish people," Rabbi Richman said, "not coerce them. Via 'ways of pleasantness,' we will achieve a renewal of unified Jewish observance and practice."

 

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